Twin Ladder Design © 2013

Wayne Moseley, the Owner-Operator of TWIN LADDER DESIGN:

A graduate of The Cooper Union School of Art,  I bring to projects more than 30 years experience in all types of painting. Employed eighteen years at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, I patinated bronzes, painted reliefs, worked as a mold maker, and designed product for the Museum's gift shops. I was also Scenic Charge at  Kadan Productions, Inc. - a company which builds and produces fashion shows and events - for five years; supervising the painting of projects for clients such as Diane von Furstenberg, Tommy Hilfiger, Calvin Klein, Banana Republic, Victoria's Secret, Marc Jacobs, Michael Kors, Vera Wang, Chanel, Hermes, Donna Karan, Hugo Boss, Kate Spade, J. Crew, Lacoste, Proenza, Amazon, MoMA, and others.

Gilding a bronze statue to be presented to Brooke Astor

In 1994, The Metropolitan Museum of Art created four bronze miniatures of Augustus Saint-Gaudens' Diana. They were gifted to the Museum's four major donors.

Mold Making at Gracie Mansion

involved making a silicone mold of an ormolu ornament from a Federal-period table by Charles-Honore Lannuier.  I was hired by Leigh Keno,  representing a client whose estate sale included a table of the same period and design. The client's piece, however, was missing the ormolu ornament on the front of the table. Setting up shop on the wrap around porch, I was able to provide a mold from which a replacement casting could be made.

Twin Ladder Design     Decorative Painting

Wayne Moseley is an EPA Certified Renovator: R-I-8848-16-00234

In the Permanent Collection of
The Metropolitan Museum of Art,

standing under the Architrave of King Khafre, which I painted for the exhibition Egyptian Art in the Age of the Pyramids. The original stone, buried deep underground, is one of the foundation stones of a pyramid, and could not be removed to be exhibited. The carving, a cartouche of King Khafre, not visible from inside the pyramid, was discovered only when archeologists explored a robber's tunnel running alongside the structure. The stone, from a period older than the structure it supports, had been recycled for the construction - with the cartouche turned to the outside. This epoxy replica simulates the original stone's red granite surface.